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kohldad

Goose Creek, SC

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Posted: 05/27/19 07:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What do folks who may need emergency help carry with them for non-cell coverage? Was thinking either renting a satellite phone or getting a SPOT.

Note: Yes I realize emergency help can be hours away but want to reduce the time for help to arrive.


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2004 Lance 815 (prev: 2004 FW 35'; 1994 TT 30'; Tents)


folivier

Southeast Louisiana

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Posted: 05/27/19 07:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We've carried a basic SPOT for years, never needed it except to send a check-in. We recently got a SPOT X for our trip to Alaska. This allows us to do 2 way texting. Some people like the Garmin device.

jimbob3ca

British Columbia

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Posted: 05/27/19 08:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have used an Inreach Explorer for about six years now.
https://www.inreachcanada.com/
This unit allows not only emergency location service, but a plan can be selected that will allow it to be used as a communication device while out of cell service. It can be set up with select email addresses or with phone numbers for texting. The message length is limited to 160 characters. The advantage of this unit is that communication is two way whereas others are one way. You can also suspend the service for a minimal charge when you don't plan to be using it for a while.
It has been fairly reliable but I have had occasional messages that failed to reach intended recipients. Haven't had to use it for emergency yet. You can also select a plan that allows someone to track your position when you are out and about if you have the unit on. We have used it to follow our son on several long distance bike race epics, including mountain bike race from Banff south to the Mexican border.
I would recommend this unit for what you seem to want.

cewillis

Tucson, az, usa

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Posted: 05/27/19 09:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

folivier wrote:

We've carried a basic SPOT for years, never needed it except to send a check-in.

Same for me. But it could literally be a life-saver if you ever need it.


Cal


pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 05/27/19 09:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A two way device of some kind.


Regards, Don
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Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

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Posted: 05/27/19 11:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had an InReach for 5 years. Two-way texting, as someone mentioned above. I send a preset message to my family each evening when I make camp; this message says all is well and gives them the coordinates of my camp.

Other available services: emergency aid, map tracking, more frequent messages, custom weather report, etc.

The InReach is small and portable. It holds its charge very well. It can tether to my iPad or iPhone via the Earthmate app for downloading maps or for using the iPad keyboard to type messages.

InReach uses two satellite systems. It will send out a message from any place where you can see the sky. It doesn't usually work inside the RV; holding it out the window sometimes does the trick. Outside, under trees, not so good; moving out of shade to a more open area solves that.

One service offered by Spot which is not yet available for InReach is the Save Our Vehicles program. InReach brings aid for people.

https://explore.garmin.com/en-US/inreach/ Owner's manuals are available on the Garmin site; read them so you know what you are getting.

Please note that you have to be conscious to push the button that sends for help. It might be a good idea to show your travel partners how to use the device.


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alaska dennis

homer ak

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Posted: 05/27/19 11:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Carry bug dope. Have a sign describing your problem and some sort of emergency light . Flag down the first vehicle. (bug dope) I don't stop for emergency flashers unless I see a person.
to many people use their flashers for picture taking--no emergency.

tony lee

Dallas TX to AK via Niagara Falls and Dempster Hwy

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Posted: 05/27/19 02:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

alaska dennis wrote:

Carry bug dope. Have a sign describing your problem and some sort of emergency light . Flag down the first vehicle. (bug dope) I don't stop for emergency flashers unless I see a person.
to many people use their flashers for picture taking--no emergency.


So you run over the bank into the forest and are badly injured. So you get out your sign writing kit, and using your powerful flashlight to see in the dark, describe your situation on the board you always carryand clamber up the cliff to sit on the side of the roadto wait for the next car to come along and read your sign.
Must get a bit heavy carrying it all when you wander off on a long hike. A Delorme SE is much better


Tony
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alaska dennis

homer ak

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Posted: 05/27/19 03:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So you run over the bank into the forest and are badly injured. Well Tony then you will probably die. But if you blew a tire and needed a jack then a simple help sign would get somebody to help you.
Last summer on a trip out from alaska I hit a Bison. My emergency communications were with AAA road service. I spent a week in Fort Nelson. this year I brought along a laptop for the Wifi. Now I am covered for communication with homebase (spouse)
Oh Tony try your Delorme SE at about 10 mile Haines highway where there is no gps coverage and then what would you do?

kohldad

Goose Creek, SC

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Posted: 05/27/19 04:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Oh Tony try your Delorme SE at about 10 mile Haines highway where there is no gps coverage


Did you mean cell coverage? Never heard of gaps of GPS coverage in driveable Alaska. Plus the Delorme SE uses Iridium network which is suppose to have 100% Earth coverage.

Just trying to understand the limits of the units as while I'm purchasing for Canada/Alaska trip, I plan on using for several years while I travel to other remote locations in North America.

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