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tropical36

Southwest Florida_USA

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Posted: 09/25/18 09:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gjac wrote:

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric. I dry camp 95% of the time and tried to compare costs going to residential. What I have gleaned from these discussions is that I would have to add 2 more batteries, at least another 100 amp battery charger maybe more if I wanted to reduce generator time, a pure sine wave inverter to run the residential, some solar and all the cabling to keep the 4 6 v GC batteries healthy not sure If I missed anything. My question is what would all this cost vs a new Norcold if one had to pay someone to do all this work?

On our 98 gasser, I installed an extra outlet from the after market MSW 1KW inverter, I had installed previously. With two 6 volt batteries, it supplied the RV fridge while underway, but not for long, when standing alone. Most sure a residential would have done a lot better. Either way, one doesn't need a huge fancy fridge, that requires a PSW inverter and adding a couple of extra batteries would be optional. I think given all the options and especially on an older coach, I'd go for a $400 residential and with keeping the batteries charged with the genset, as required, when boon docking. Probably could use some extra shelves built on the side for taking up the extra space, after making the switch, too.


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steved28

Bellingham,MA,USA

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Posted: 09/25/18 12:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gjac wrote:

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric.


Sorry if this is a dumb question but, how does one get a residential refridgerator (physically) INTO an RV after the fact?


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jplante4

Cape Cod

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Posted: 09/25/18 02:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Both Dometic and Vitrifrigo America have AC/DC compressor fridges that are basically the same size as a Norcold 600 series propane. We got the Dometic one in the store and ran it just on a fully charged group 24 12v battery for 40 hours.


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Ivylog

Blairsville, GA and WPB, FL.

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Posted: 09/25/18 02:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gjac wrote:

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric. I dry camp 95% of the time and tried to compare costs going to residential. What I have gleaned from these discussions is that I would have to add 2 more batteries, at least another 100 amp battery charger maybe more if I wanted to reduce generator time, a pure sine wave inverter to run the residential, some solar and all the cabling to keep the 4 6 v GC batteries healthy not sure If I missed anything. My question is what would all this cost vs a new Norcold if one had to pay someone to do all this work?

One advantage of a $1000 Samsung refer is it does not need a PSW inverter because the compressor is DC but it’s 7” taller than a 1200. Both can go through the MIs door with their doors off. I’m planning on 4-5 hours to do this swap for a fellow RVer this weekend. This assumes there will not be much woodwork involved.

I put in a 21 cuft Whirlpool myself that I hoped would fit perfectly (ended up 1/2” to tall)...$500 refer, 2 batteries $300, 1000W PSW inverter $300, 100A charger $250..:$1350. Had to bring it in the drivers window because it is not counter depth. Probably had 10-12 hours labor.


This post is my opinion (free advice). It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.

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jplante4

Cape Cod

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Posted: 09/25/18 02:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steved28 wrote:

Sorry if this is a dumb question but, how does one get a residential refridgerator (physically) INTO an RV after the fact?


Usually you have to remove a window. In fact, most rigs won't let an RV fridge in the door.

Robbie Welch

Maryland

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Posted: 09/25/18 05:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I changed over to a residential refrigerator 2 years ago and would not go back. I dry camp a lot (racing) a lot of times I run a small 2K watt generator and it just sits there and idles. The batteries last thru the night. Going down the road the alternator keeps the batteries charged no problem. The only thing about the residential refrigerator is it can be noisy but I'll take that. I also run a mini refrigerator in one of the side compartments with no problems so that's 2 . If you have a solar panel I'm sure it would cut down on the generator usage. Hope this helps

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 09/25/18 07:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ivylog wrote:

Gjac wrote:

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric. I dry camp 95% of the time and tried to compare costs going to residential. What I have gleaned from these discussions is that I would have to add 2 more batteries, at least another 100 amp battery charger maybe more if I wanted to reduce generator time, a pure sine wave inverter to run the residential, some solar and all the cabling to keep the 4 6 v GC batteries healthy not sure If I missed anything. My question is what would all this cost vs a new Norcold if one had to pay someone to do all this work?

One advantage of a $1000 Samsung refer is it does not need a PSW inverter because the compressor is DC but it’s 7” taller than a 1200. Both can go through the MIs door with their doors off. I’m planning on 4-5 hours to do this swap for a fellow RVer this weekend. This assumes there will not be much woodwork involved.

I put in a 21 cuft Whirlpool myself that I hoped would fit perfectly (ended up 1/2” to tall)...$500 refer, 2 batteries $300, 1000W PSW inverter $300, 100A charger $250..:$1350. Had to bring it in the drivers window because it is not counter depth. Probably had 10-12 hours labor.
Thanks for the associated costs. If one were to add the solar that others like pianotuna talks about to maintain the batteries, I see folks advocating between 400 - 1000 watts of solar what would those cost be?

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 09/25/18 08:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

$2 per watt for DIY. That is up since the tariffs were instituted.

The biggest cost is "getting it wrong". For example the solar charge controller I have is maxed out. Replacing it is far more expensive than adding panels.

Two https://www.solarblvd.com/products/12-volt-240-watt-solar-panel-kit/ would be 480 watts, total cost for all materials $600.00. Add a MSW Cobra 2500 watt inverter for $200.

Based on 5 solar "hours" per day the harvest would be 2.5 kwh. That is enough to run a residential fridge.

Solar Blvd suggests such a system would produce about 77 kwh per month.

Gjac wrote:

If one were to add the solar that others like pianotuna talks about to maintain the batteries, I see folks advocating between 400 - 1000 watts of solar what would those cost be?


* This post was edited 09/25/18 09:03pm by pianotuna *


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

Joatha

Marietta, GA

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Posted: 09/26/18 07:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steved28 wrote:

Gjac wrote:

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric.


Sorry if this is a dumb question but, how does one get a residential refridgerator (physically) INTO an RV after the fact?


I removed the doors and hinges from the Samsung (RF18) and took it in through the front door of my Wanderlodge. It took my brother, my nephew, and I about an hour to get it in but only about 10 minutes to actually move it up and in. The remainder of the time was spent removing/re-installing the doors and hinges.

I also had removed the handle and some other hardware by the stairs at the front door - took me 5 minutes to put it back.

The other option is removing a window or the windshield. Fortunately, I didn't have to do that but some RV's may not have the space at the door. My front door has a 27" opening and the fridge needed 24" without doors and hinges so I had plenty of room.

BTW, I also had to remove the doors and hinges off the old RV refrigerator to get it out of there as well.


2001 Bluebird Wanderlodge LX ME

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