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 > Smoked Chuck Roast

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jkwilson

Indiana

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Posted: 12/11/22 03:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The result was probably very similar to brisket on a smaller scale. Good food!


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dedmiston

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Posted: 12/12/22 08:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jkwilson wrote:

The result was probably very similar to brisket on a smaller scale. Good food!


Yeah. Kind of. It's definitely a different cut with different characteristics and even a different flavor. The chuck is more marbled but the brisket has fat caps and the big fat separator between the flat and the point. The chuck is kind of too ugly to slice, but the brisket looks pretty sexy when you slice it.

I guess the biggest difference between the two is the scale though. You can probably find the brisket for a buck a pound less, but a whole brisket is such a big cut that it's a more serious investment. I probably spent under $20 for the chuck, but a brisket is at least a $75 cut. You're taking a bigger risk if you mess up a brisket than a smaller roast. Plus the brisket is a bigger time investment (usually 12-14 hours). Briskets are a lot of fun though. Plus there's SO MUCH you can do with the packets of leftovers compared to the chuck.

It's all a lot of fun though. I think my favorites are still the pork butts because they're such a no-brainer and the leftovers are so amazing. I parcel mine out into vacuum-sealed pouches and freeze them for later. Two good sized butts will keep us in tacos for months.


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derouen6

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Posted: 12/12/22 03:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Been making roux, quarts at a time for over 50 years. You done good??????

dedmiston

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Posted: 12/12/22 03:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks. [emoticon]

The plot thickened last night when I tried to serve the leftovers. More accurately, the gravy thickened.

I reheated the gravy and no amount of heat was going to turn it back into a liquid again. I could have baked it into Meat Muffins, but it didn't want to become gravy no matter what.

I finally heated up some more beef broth and stirred it into the gravy and finally got the congealed gravy back into a liquid again.

The leftovers are gone now, but it was all fun experience for me just like most things in the kitchen usually are.

Trekkar

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Posted: 12/13/22 07:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dedmiston wrote:

jkwilson wrote:

The result was probably very similar to brisket on a smaller scale. Good food!


Yeah. Kind of. It's definitely a different cut with different characteristics and even a different flavor. The chuck is more marbled but the brisket has fat caps and the big fat separator between the flat and the point. The chuck is kind of too ugly to slice, but the brisket looks pretty sexy when you slice it.

I guess the biggest difference between the two is the scale though. You can probably find the brisket for a buck a pound less, but a whole brisket is such a big cut that it's a more serious investment. I probably spent under $20 for the chuck, but a brisket is at least a $75 cut. You're taking a bigger risk if you mess up a brisket than a smaller roast. Plus the brisket is a bigger time investment (usually 12-14 hours). Briskets are a lot of fun though. Plus there's SO MUCH you can do with the packets of leftovers compared to the chuck.

It's all a lot of fun though. I think my favorites are still the pork butts because they're such a no-brainer and the leftovers are so amazing. I parcel mine out into vacuum-sealed pouches and freeze them for later. Two good sized butts will keep us in tacos for months.


Smokers are great for so many foods. I usually add a little broth to my leftover roux when I refrigerate it to keep it from turning to cement. What kind of wood did you use for your cook?


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dedmiston

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Posted: 12/13/22 09:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Trekkar wrote:

Smokers are great for so many foods. I usually add a little broth to my leftover roux when I refrigerate it to keep it from turning to cement. What kind of wood did you use for your cook?


I started smoking about seven years ago and I've tried all sorts of different woods and finally decided that my household couldn't tell the difference. I finally settled on "whatever I've got laying around". It's a pellet smoker, so it's not as if I'm using scrap lumber. I just pick up whatever's on sale though.

I usually buy mostly apple and cherry because they're milder. They still put out great flavor without tasting like a woodpile.

magnusfide

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Posted: 12/13/22 03:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dedmiston wrote:



The leftovers are gone now, but it was all fun experience for me just like most things in the kitchen usually are.


I like to call the kitchen my chemistry lab. I'll experiment and the family doesn't mind at all.


"The only time you should fear cast iron is if your wife is fixin' to hit you with it."-Kent Rollins
First law of science: don't spit into the wind.

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dedmiston

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Posted: 12/13/22 03:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

magnusfide wrote:

I like to call the kitchen my chemistry lab. I'll experiment and the family doesn't mind at all.


I love it! Great attitude.

I have an apron that says, "No matter what happens, we're eating it."

oldcat1

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Posted: 12/13/22 04:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have an apron that says, "No matter what happens, we're eating it."

Now that's funny right there.


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magnusfide

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Posted: 12/14/22 06:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dedmiston wrote:



I have an apron that says, "No matter what happens, we're eating it."


You've given me a great idea. I just put that apron on my Christmas list. [emoticon]

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