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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 07/04/20 12:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

sdickbos wrote:

Thank you, lots of good info. Do most people who boondock run a generator?


Yup and no lack of boondocking spots once you get past the big cities in AB/ BC.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

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Posted: 07/04/20 08:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just like the recent commenters that have posted pretty much sums it up that I can also verify -

I have no solar power and rarely use my Honda 2000 generator which is mainly for a backup and glad to have it when it is needed....Fairbanks region does NOT get dark between mid May thru the first week of August, so plenty of daylight here during summer - it will get dark south of the Alaska Range like 3 to 4 hours per day in the Anchorage area during June ...

Solid repacking wheel bearings and quality tires is a must for a piece of mind trip like this - you especially don't want mechanical problems in remote Canada unless you want to give up one of your kidneys and first born per se.

I would highly recommend installing new wheel bearings with new races since the travel trailer was mentioned well used condition...

Living here in the arctic region I only use red #2 lithium grease year round for all my rigs and trailer, as it has a very high and low temperature range protection, doesn't break down much and has decent water resistance too.

Frost heaves are sparsely around the Yukon and a few places in Alaska, you really want to slow down while driving thru these bumpy spots or face potential damage to suspension parts or worse...

Binoculars.....make sure you have binoculars onhand too.


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ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 07/04/20 09:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Adjust your thinking. The North is the Great Wide Open. Talk of Wal-Mart parking lots and state parks is absurd. There are 100,000 places to camp for free. You can be next a river almost anytime you want.

I like early Sept for traveling in the Interior. The tourists are gone, it is fall. Everyone is getting their wood cut and trying to kill a moose to get through the winter. The Northern Lights are out most nights.

* This post was edited 07/07/20 08:21am by ppine *

K_and_I

North Central Ohio

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Posted: 07/07/20 08:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There is a lot of good advice already given. We did a 10 week trip last summer. Due to previous commitments, we couldn't leave until mid-July. We were concerned about the "rainy season" but it didn't happen last year. We spent 23 hours stopped on the Sterling Hwy by Cooper Landing at a road block because of wild fires ahead. It was nice having a generator then. Several people asked to plug in to charge their phones, etc. Wadcutter mentioned about seeing the mountain in Denali Park. We took the longest bus trip, and saw a lot of wild life, but not the mountain. We did see it several times from a pullout just east of Cantwell on the Denali Hwy. We stayed a number of nights at the campground in Cantwell as we had to have a new converter shipped up from the lower 48 when ours went bad. It's all part of the trip. I'm glad we went. Don't know if we'll get the chance again. One good thing about going later in the season, we were able to see the northern lights at Fairbanks 3 different nights. We had been told if we were in Fairbanks in Sept there is a good chance of seeing them. I came to the conclusion early on that you can't do it all in one trip, so focus on the things that mean the most to you.


K_and_I
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PA12DRVR

Back in God's Country

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Posted: 07/07/20 10:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Above is all generally good advice.

My $0.015 (prices are down due to pandemic restrictions on travel [emoticon] )
- Think about how much time you'd like to take on the trip, then double it. There are limitless opportunities in the NW (I'm thinking, Washington, BC, YT, possibly Alberta, and of course Alaska) where one could park the TT and spend days noodling around with your tow vehicle, hiking, seeing the sights, etc.
- Think about the cost of the trip and double it. Not practical, of course, but while the travel cost is what it is, there are all sorts of paid commercial excursions that, if there's any way possible, should not be missed. Glacier cruises, flightseeing over McKinley, fishing, bear viewing, dog sled rides (that one always puzzles me to be honest), ATV Cruises, Glacier hikes, etc, etc, etc.
- Expect and be prepared for rain. If it doesn't happen, great, but be prepared.
- Bring the best binoculars and photo gear you can. Depending on one's interests, good hiking boots as well.


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sdickbos

Chicago,IL USA

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Posted: 07/07/20 11:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks everybidy

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 07/07/20 08:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

sdickbos wrote:

Great advice, just beginning planning hopefully for May-June 2021. Just reading your post is getting me excited. We are looking at a used 18 footer, unfortunately it is a single axle, but the price is right and the layout is good for us. My husband drives and I do all the planning so I really appreciate the advice. If you think of anything else let me know. Would you mind sharing your itinerary from Illinois to B.C. And where did you cross? Thanks again


Driving to and sight seeing in AK is about the best application I can think of for a smallish single axle TT.
And the best application for those ones that look cool with the lift kits and mud tires.
I can't stand getting into these threads because I WANT TO GO BACK! He!!, I'm excited for you!
Generator, yes, spare tires, yes, fishing gear, bring ALL of it!
Plan campgrounds for the crowded areas, like Homer, Denali, etc. The rest you an pretty much wing it and park wherever.
Not literally and it's nice to hit some NF campgrounds, but it's not intimidating once you realize you're in Alaska and there ARE roads and people speak engrish and you can buy gas and don't have to shoot a caribou for dinner and a seal for lamp oil!

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