Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: RV Pet Stop: Coronavirus
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in RV Pet Stop

Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop  >  General Topics

 > Coronavirus

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 10  
Prev
dturm

Lake County, IN

Moderator

Joined: 01/29/2001

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/19/20 11:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Really neat possibilities..

I also read this morning that a saliva test for COVID is being more widely used (the one developed for and paid for by the NBA). They are using it at the U of Illinois for students and staff. They have repurposed the veterinary lab to process the tests. They get results in 2-3 hours and reliability is close to the PCR swab test.

This type and speed of testing is really necessary to safely open schools and businesses. It allows for almost immediate isolation of positive cases and effective contact tracing to reduce spread.


Doug & Sandy
Kaylee (12 year old Terrier of some sort), Sasha 3 yr old Golden
Kaiya at the Rainbow Bridge
2008 Southwind
2009 Honda CRV


Check out blog.rv.net


DOTLDaddy

Camp Canine, STL County, MO.

Senior Member

Joined: 05/10/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 08/22/20 02:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kinda interesting research where I used to work.

https://www.stlmag.com/health/news/washi........-coronavirus-vaccine-is-working-in-mice/


Walter & Garland - Camp Canine caretakers
Miss Inga (aka "Shorty") - 6 y.o. old GSD.
Gen. Gretchen - Joined Rainbow Div., June 27, 2017 at age 13
Gen. Missy - Joined Rainbow Div., June 11,2006 at age 12
2018 Montana HC305RL 5th wheel
2018 Silverado HD 6.0L



dturm

Lake County, IN

Moderator

Joined: 01/29/2001

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/22/20 03:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That is really cool. We have a couple of nasal vaccines available in Vet Medicine and they are very effective. Kind of difficult to administer to an uncooperative dog, but that's another story [emoticon]

It looks like this vaccine may be a year or more away as it has to go through phase 2 and 3 trials successfully before approval.

The great things about medical science right now is that the techniques have advanced so much in the recent years and there are so many people/businesses and countries working on this that we're probably going to get something that works in amazingly short time in terms of normal vaccine development time frame.

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2002

View Profile



Posted: 08/27/20 11:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is a preprint on a serological test for SARS-CoV-2 across multiple animal species. This test can be used to determine if a pet (or any other animal) has had Covid-19.

Here's how it works. The receptor binding region of the virus (portion of the spike that binds to cells to start the infection) is coated in a plate (test device). Serum from the possibly affected animal is added to the plate and any antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds to the material coated on the plate. The excess serum is washed out and a species specific detection antibody is added to the plate. Any antibodies that bind to the SARs-CoV-2 material in the plate AND is the same species as the detection antibody will produce a titer signal. The same titer plate can be used for any species; only the detection reagent needs to be selected for the species being tested.

Multi-species ELISA for the detection of........antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in animals

I forgot to note that this is of interest to the medical community to enable determining what animal species might become reservoirs for this virus.

* This post was edited 08/27/20 02:31pm by BCSnob *

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2002

View Profile



Posted: 08/28/20 07:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Add rabbits to the short list of animals that can become infected with SARS-CoV-2. This study did not investigate if rabbits inoculated with the virus can pass the virus onto humans.

Susceptibility of rabbits to SARS-CoV-2

Quote:

Abstract

Transmission of severe acute respiratory coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) between livestock and humans is a potential public health concern. We demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to SARS-CoV-2, which excrete infectious virus from the nose and throat upon experimental inoculation. Therefore, investigations on the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in farmed rabbits should be considered.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused a pandemic only months after its discovery in December 2019 (1). Slowing down its spread requires a full understanding of transmission routes, including those from humans to animals and vice versa. In experimental settings, non-human primates, ferrets, cats, dogs and hamsters have been found to be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection (2-4). Moreover, ferrets, cats and hamsters were able to transmit the virus via the air (2, 4, 5). In domestic settings, both dogs and cats have been found to carry the virus, displaying very mild to more severe symptoms, respectively (5). Recently, SARS-CoV-2 has been isolated from mink at multiple Dutch farms. Workers at those farms carried viruses that were highly similar to the viruses detected in mink and phylogenetic analyses supported transmission from mink to workers (6). Thus, measures to control the spread of SARS38
CoV-2 should also include preventing spill over into potential reservoirs, especially since infectious agents can spread rapidly in livestock due to the high densities at which some animals are kept. Given the fact that rabbits are commonly farmed worldwide, we investigated the susceptibility of rabbits to SARS-CoV-2.


* This post was edited 08/28/20 07:20am by BCSnob *

Finally Time

Western Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 08/28/20 04:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have wondered about the "upper respiratory virus" my cat had in late February. He was sneezing a lot and had a real raspy horse meow. No eye or nasal discharge. His appetite was good and he didn't seem to be in any distress. Hard to tell if a middle-aged cat is sleeping more than normal.

I took him to the vet's and $800 later they diagnosed an upper respiratory virus and said to let it run its' course, no meds required. Two more days and he seemed just fine. About the same time I had what I thought was a mild cold with a general run-down feeling. Now I am questioning what we both might have had.


'17 Tiffin Breeze 31BR, '13 Honda CR-V
Ready Brute Elite Tow Bar & Brake System


dturm

Lake County, IN

Moderator

Joined: 01/29/2001

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/28/20 07:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Western Washington in late Feb, I'd also be curious. If and when we get a good reliable antibody test, results could tell you.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 10  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop  >  General Topics

 > Coronavirus
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in RV Pet Stop


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.