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 > trailer size and campsites in National Parks

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Camper8251

Gallatin Valley MT

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Posted: 10/29/19 07:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Somebody else could answer that better..... There are lot of self appointed weight police around.....LOL

The Gross weight of the lance looks good. Don't know about tongue weight though.

Lance make a nice camper. I looked at the new models prior to purchasing my TT.. Couple of thoughts though.. That window above the bed.... Will it leak? Lots of truck campers that have window in the cab over leak from that area,

#2 is that window dual pane?? Most likely it is. However what kind of heat loss in the cold temps are you going to get from it, and in the sun how much heat will it bring into the camper?? On the flip side you will have a nice view from it..

That bed, looks like its a fold up... How comfortable is that thing going to be after multiple nights in it? I had a sleeper sofa at home that was real hell to sleep on...

* This post was edited 10/29/19 07:30pm by Camper8251 *


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bgum

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Posted: 10/29/19 07:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The 1995 is a nice looking camper. It is 4 seasons so it should be comfortable. Be sure to get the largest AC possible. Hope you have good luck with it.

NatParkJunkie

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Posted: 10/29/19 08:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

most people on the forums here probably wouldn't agree with me, but you might want to check out truck campers. As a solo traveler, I find my truck camper very easy to handle. 9 times out of 10, I don't even think about where I'm going to go with the camper. You can get a lot further off the beaten path than any other type of rig. If I do end up somewhere that I can't continue on, it's never been a problem to back up and turn around. Never need to plan ahead to pull into any gas station, never had a problem fitting into any campground site (except for height if there were low branches in a tent site). If I'm traveling between destinations and see something cool, just pull right on over to check it out like in a car.

Truck campers are a lot tighter on space, and you would likely need a truck upgrade to haul it safely. My 4,500-ish pound Arctic fox needs a 3500 dually to handle the weight.
Occasionally I start to get a little cabin fever due to the small interior space, but hey my living room is a huge expansive public lands outdoors instead!

As you're traveling, don't limit yourself only to national parks.....There's tons of awesome national monuments and state parks. As well as tons of BLM land out west with free boondocking camping opportunities. I do spend time camping in national park campgrounds, but the costs can start to add up after awhile. Plus, when I'm camping, I'd much rather enjoy nature with no nearby neighbors (and frequently no visible neighbors), instead of being packed into a public campground with random neighbors all the time.

update: I've visited 30 national parks and 69 national monuments/preserves/military parks, etc. 99/419. Not all with my truck camper, like the last park I visited: Dry Tortugas. An amazing place, that you can only reach by boat or sea plane. I tent camped 2 nights on the beach under the stars there!

* This post was edited 10/29/19 08:58pm by NatParkJunkie *

MarkTwain

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Posted: 10/29/19 09:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

robvasi wrote:

Camper8251 wrote:

When you are looking at Trailers also look at Sleeping bed size, Tank sizes... If you are looking for solar, note that when it says wired for solar most just talk about a port in the side of the trailer that has wires to the batteries.....

A queen bed in a Trailer can mean either a camper queen or an actual queen.

Also take a good hard look at the Towing Specs for your rig too. That will have a big factor on what you can buy also...


My RAM 1500 will tow 7900, but will it really? with a safe margin?

A lot to consider. and I need to have one by the end of next month.


Your Ram truck will work on flat roads and no strong winds. Could be a different story when you start traveling up mountains or driving into strong head winds. If your truck is diesel, strongly recommend an exhaust brake. If possible, I would recommend a Dodge 2500 att least.

Rover_Bill

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Posted: 10/29/19 10:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MarkTwain wrote:


Your Ram truck will work on flat roads and no strong winds. Could be a different story when you start traveling up mountains or driving into strong head winds. If your truck is diesel, strongly recommend an exhaust brake. If possible, I would recommend a Dodge 2500 att least.


I get a real laugh whenever I pass a big 2500 TV pulling a little 20' TT up a 7% grade through the mountains with my little 3.6L Canyon pulling a 30' 7000# TT.

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GrandpaKip

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Posted: 10/30/19 07:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You need to look at payload rather than towing weight. What your truck is rated to carry is listed on the driver’s door jamb. This is usually the limiting factor for towing. You will run out of payload before reaching the max tow weight.


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MarkTwain

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Posted: 10/30/19 07:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rover_Bill wrote:

MarkTwain wrote:


Your Ram truck will work on flat roads and no strong winds. Could be a different story when you start traveling up mountains or driving into strong head winds. If your truck is diesel, strongly recommend an exhaust brake. If possible, I would recommend a Dodge 2500 att least.


I get a real laugh whenever I pass a big 2500 TV pulling a little 20' TT up a 7% grade through the mountains with my little 3.6L Canyon pulling a 30' 7000# TT.

[emoticon]


Interesting perspective. In the long run, whose engine is working harder and which engine will last longer without any major engine repairs?

WVcampground

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Posted: 10/30/19 07:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rr2254545 wrote:

robvasi wrote:

rr2254545 wrote:

Of the 49 National Parks in the lower 48 only 8 have full hookup sites and another 8 have sites with electric, leaving 33 with no camping at all - twenty one feet will limit you and you will soon grow to regret your decision

We have visited 31 or the 49 in the last 10 years


Do you mean 21' is too long or too small?


Way too small


I know plenty of people with trailers of @ that size or smaller and they get by just fine, even at national parks. Not everyone needs or wants something like this to go camping.


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MarkTwain

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Posted: 10/30/19 07:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MarkTwain wrote:

robvasi wrote:

Camper8251 wrote:

When you are looking at Trailers also look at Sleeping bed size, Tank sizes...

Tank size will be a major factor determining how often to you have empty or fill up you fresh water tanks, depending on where you are staying. In RV parks with full hook ups, no problem.
.


jesseannie

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Posted: 10/30/19 08:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Oasisbob wrote:

21 feet seems to be the max in Oregon for the most part. Bigger is not always better. So many variables here.


Really?
I have camped in Oregon a lot and my 26' (30' overall) travel trailer fits in most national forest campgrounds and in all state parks. I have never had a problem.

Jesseannie

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