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 > RVs and California's Planned Power Outages

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Reisender

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Posted: 10/10/19 02:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TechWriter wrote:

Orcadrvr wrote:

I don't regard the OP as "whinging" or "whining".
I don't think it's unreasonable to expect public utilities to maintain their facilities in a way that doesn't jeopardize public safety.

Time to install that backup generator, California. (They make natural gas gennies, too.)

Because a Honda 2000 or an RV gen ain't gonna power a 200A (or 100A) service house.

With apologies to Bob Dylan, You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.


You be surprised though. A 2k generator will keep the fridge going and a few essential lights. Heat is another story. As long as the natural gas compressors are running we have hot water and a natural gas fireplace.

Our backup plan is a couple AGM 31 batteries powering a 2000 watt inverter/charger. It’s good for a couple days running the fridge and a few lights, charging cell phones, TV etc. Sits quietly in the corner of the garage always plugged and charged. We manually run three extension cords to the fridge and two key rooms. Rarely gets used but handy. Cooking is a Coleman stove or barbecue. If we needed to go more than two days I would be pulling the Motorhome up in front of the townhouse and running the generator to charge the AGM’s. There is 800 watts of solar on the roof of the Moho as well. I’m sure all the neighbours would be trying to run extension cords to their fridges. [emoticon]

rgatijnet1

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Posted: 10/10/19 03:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As I mentioned before, we have our motor home always ready for hurricanes.
One other thing that I did, which applies to any area of the country that loses power, is to run 12 volt power to several LED ceiling lights throughout the stick house. These are all controlled by a central switch panel and they allow me to light any room in the house during a power outage. The surface LED ceiling lights that I use only draw about 1/2 amp at 12 volts so when hooked up to a normal 12 volt automotive battery, they will provide lighting for weeks. In my house it is a piece of cake to run the low voltage wire(I used 14 gauge speaker wire since it uses two different colored wires) in the attic and hook up to the ceiling lights. With these LED lights, I only have to fire up the generator to keep the kitchen appliances cold and have enough juice from a single automotive battery to light the house all night long for weeks if the need arises. Amazon sells a 5 pack of 12 volt LED ceiling fixtures for about $45. There is no need to buy a battery if you just want to take the one from your toad when needed. I keep one hooked up to my lights and a trickle charger since we do lose power quite often during lightening storms.

Chum lee

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Posted: 10/10/19 03:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After PG&E's experience with Erin Brockovich, and, now being held legally responsible for the Camp fire, (among just a few major lawsuits) can you blame PG&E for trying to protect themselves financially, while keeping their stock holders happy at the same time? IMO, in this case PG&E WAS at least partially responsible for getting themselves sued.

It's big money in action folks. The consumer doesn't get it both ways! If you don't like it, start your own electric company. Many RVer's already have because most of us have learned to live without (dependable) electric power.

Chum lee

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Posted: 10/10/19 03:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A typical day for us is about 18 -20 kwh including about 6 per day into the EV’s. But in minimalist mode we can live with about 2 kwh per day and keep the fridge on. Or at least until the cars run down. But then again, if there is no power I won’t be going to work as it will be dark. [emoticon]. In which case the cars won’t runs down very fast. [emoticon].

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bert Ackerman wrote:

Ozlander wrote:

Here in Kansas we have higher winds than Calif, and don't have power lines coming down when the wind blows.


That's amazing isn't it? And not many corn fields going up in conflagrations either. How do you do it?

CA folks get exactly what they brought on themselves by putting the folks in office who come up with the policies, and they keep doing it over and over. No sympathy whatsoever. Maybe they can erect a roof made of non conductive materials over the entire state to prevent lightning.


Or maybe it's because a blown corn plant won't fall on and destroy the lines like a tree limb will. Or possibly because Kansas sees rainfall on a regular basis, whereas California can go six months without more than 1/2 inch of rain total.

Sheesh, that's a pretty lame comparison.


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toedtoes

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

discovery4us wrote:

Is turning power off a practice of other power companies? I have heard of power outages due to a weather event but never heard of turning power off for a forecasted weather event.

As a kid on the Gulf Coast I remember having power go out during a storm but never turned off prior to the storm.


This is a stop gap measure due to last year's fires. Until PG&E can complete their repairs of old and/or damaged lines, another fire is a great risk. So, they are cutting power to prevent another huge wildfire when the weather is at it's most dangerous (dry and windy).

Just listened to a story about a town in the east. The town has flooded several times over the past few years. People have died. They found that the historic buildings on Main street were preventing water from being able to escape the street. So they tore down some of those buildings to prevent continued flooding. Sometimes, you have to make tough decisions to keep folks alive.

toedtoes

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orcadrvr wrote:

I don't regard the OP as "whinging" or "whining".
I don't think it's unreasonable to expect public utilities to maintain their facilities in a way that doesn't jeopardize public safety.
In lieu of that, they are shutting off power to hundreds of thousands of residents. I was born in Los Angeles, and have lived here all my life, and only relatively recently have these massive conflagrations caused by power lines become an issue.
PG&E, the northern Cal. utility, allowed a natural gas pipeline to deteriorate to the point that an explosion killed 8 people and caused over $500,000,000 in damages. Last year, their power lines fell and caused a huge fire which wiped out an entire town and killed 85 people.
We pay some of the highest rates in the country for power here.
Is it too much to ask that the equipment be properly maintained?


It's not the OP being called out for whinging. It's all the armchair quarterbacks who would rather sit and condemn California/PG&E for doing something while at the same time condemning them for doing nothing. And of course making armchair decisions that would "solve the problem immediately" with no concept of reality.

time2roll

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

Learning more about this every day
IT would be best to properly trim trees and maintain lines.
Or bury the lines
But when PG&E sends out tree trimmers residents send lawyers "THey are ruining our trees" and now that they are turning off power "They are spoiling our food" will be the lawyer's claim.. Sadly I suspect the residents will pitch a complaint if they bury the lines too.. but .. Well..
Yes careful what you wish for. You might just get it in abundance.


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Bert Ackerman

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Posted: 10/10/19 04:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chum lee wrote:

After PG&E's experience with Erin Brockovich, and, now being held legally responsible for the Camp fire, (among just a few major lawsuits) can you blame PG&E for trying to protect themselves financially, while keeping their stock holders happy at the same time? IMO, in this case PG&E WAS at least partially responsible for getting themselves sued.

It's big money in action folks. The consumer doesn't get it both ways! If you don't like it, start your own electric company. Many RVer's already have because most of us have learned to live without (dependable) electric power.

Chum lee


Didn't they declare, or announce the intent to declare chapter 11 last January? There is only one way the consumer is going to get anything, and that will be dry when it happens.

Bert Ackerman

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Posted: 10/10/19 05:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

Bert Ackerman wrote:

Ozlander wrote:

Here in Kansas we have higher winds than Calif, and don't have power lines coming down when the wind blows.


That's amazing isn't it? And not many corn fields going up in conflagrations either. How do you do it?

CA folks get exactly what they brought on themselves by putting the folks in office who come up with the policies, and they keep doing it over and over. No sympathy whatsoever. Maybe they can erect a roof made of non conductive materials over the entire state to prevent lightning.


Or maybe it's because a blown corn plant won't fall on and destroy the lines like a tree limb will. Or possibly because Kansas sees rainfall on a regular basis, whereas California can go six months without more than 1/2 inch of rain total.

Sheesh, that's a pretty lame comparison.


No it isn't lame at all. What is lame is in 49 other states they do not have to shut down whole sections of the grid for reasons that are full blown stupidity. You ever see a prairie fire or a Florida wildfire? How about the Smokies a few years back? You CA folks take the cake. I can't even buy a can of spray paint on the other side of the country without seeing your CA idiotic BS. You choose to live there, so live with it. Been there a few times, you can have all of it.

Where are the trees that are tall enough to snap and damage HT lines? Smaller level distribution lines should be cleared on a regular basis. If PG&E isn't clearing them for whatever reason, then that's the fault of your state governments PUC being incompetent.

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