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steved28

Bellingham,MA,USA

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Posted: 09/23/18 07:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ivylog wrote:


My generator time has actually decreased after going residential BUT I added another 100A charger. 1.5 hours generator in the evening and 1/2 hour in the morning is all I need. Without a doubt, going residential is my best DIY project...helps that the NiCold was that bad.


Why was your generator use higher prior to this? It doesn't really make sense that the fridge change would cut down on generator hours if you were running on propane. Regardless, still too much running time for me, my goal is zero.


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gemsworld

Arizona West Coast

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Posted: 09/23/18 07:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

15+ years RVing with propane refrigerators without any problems.





pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 09/23/18 09:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi steved28,

That's easy. Sufficiently large battery bank with lots of solar panels. And you need to read more of the links for there are several folks who have successfully done this.

steved28 wrote:

Regardless, still too much running time for me, my goal is zero.



Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

steved28

Bellingham,MA,USA

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Posted: 09/24/18 07:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I stumbled upon this in my searches. One person's experience, but pretty good information. And it appears he is using the same model as we would have received in our RV.
Power test for residential fridge

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 09/24/18 01:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi,

They have become boaters now. They had also done a test run their roof air conditioner using a Magnum 3012. It worked, but the red fault light came on. I believe they contacted Magnum and the company suggested running the roof air with such a small inverter is not recommended.

Their test is flawed because they based it on 12 hours rather than 24. How often do you open your fridge at 3 a.m? Too bad they did not bother to tell us the kwh's used by the fridge during the test.

Who in their right mind would disconnect the 960 watts of solar???

steved28 wrote:

I stumbled upon this in my searches. One person's experience, but pretty good information. And it appears he is using the same model as we would have received in our RV.
Power test for residential fridge


Ivylog

Blairsville, GA and WPB, FL.

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Posted: 09/24/18 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

steved28 wrote:

Ivylog wrote:


My generator time has actually decreased after going residential BUT I added another 100A charger. 1.5 hours generator in the evening and 1/2 hour in the morning is all I need. Without a doubt, going residential is my best DIY project...helps that the NiCold was that bad.


Why was your generator use higher prior to this? It doesn't really make sense that the fridge change would cut down on generator hours if you were running on propane. Regardless, still too much running time for me, my goal is zero.


Guess I should have done this BUT I added another 100A charger. My 2012 inverter/charger has never put out it's rated 100 amps...closer to 70 so by adding an additional 100A charger (that does put out 100A) I've more than doubled my charging capacity. Anytime you run a high amp appliance, you need to crank your generator unless you have 1000+ W solar and close to that in AH batteries. When the DW starts dinner she cranks the generator and we shut it off after 1.5 hours. In the morning when making coffee I run it for half an hour.

"my goal is zero" generator...good luck with that because with everything turned off you will still have 2-3 amps parasitic power draw 24/7. Those gremlins is why the residential power link you provided is poorly done...did not measure the power at the refer plug. My real world #s for a 21 cuft Whirlpool measured at the input to the PSW inverter is 8 amps (12V) or 96 watts. My duty cycle is less than 50% based on being able to run it for 36 hours on two 125AH batteries before getting to 12.1 V.


This post is my opinion (free advice). It is not intended to influence anyone's judgment nor do I advocate anyone do what I propose.

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Ductape

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Posted: 09/24/18 04:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gemsworld wrote:

15+ years RVing with propane refrigerators without any problems.


+1 decades no problem.

We do have solar and a big battery bank, too. Thing is, there are those pesky trees and sometimes clouds. Last fall in NH it was cold and rained every day for a week. No sun. This week we're in the trees and we like it here. Not everybody camps in a desert.

OP made the right decision for himself, as he doesn't want to hear the generator.


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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 09/24/18 04:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi Ivylog,

I do live in an area where there is little shade and lots of sun. As a weekend warrior, when I had 875 amp-hours of battery bank, and 256 watts of solar panels, I regularly did all my cooking and coffee making without a generator. I did that for five years. Sometimes I'd even use the water heater on 120 volt.

Once I became full time I needed a generator or a massive rebuild on the solar. I chose the generator. That was the wrong path for me, and if I were starting over I'd go for the solar solution.

Ivylog wrote:

Anytime you run a high amp appliance, you need to crank your generator unless you have 1000+ W solar and close to that in AH batteries. When the DW starts dinner she cranks the generator and we shut it off after 1.5 hours. In the morning when making coffee I run it for half an hour.


steved28

Bellingham,MA,USA

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Posted: 09/25/18 08:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ivylog wrote:


"my goal is zero" generator...good luck with that because with everything turned off you will still have 2-3 amps parasitic power draw 24/7.


Granted I am not at the stage of my life yet where I get to go long periods of time without having to return to work, but when I do go out for 3-4-5 days at a time dry camping, I haven't had to use the generator for more than 5 minutes at a time. And that is only because of my wife's addiction to her hair dryer.

Maybe I've been lucky, but with 400W of solar and 2 AGM batteries, it's been all good. I have a shunt on my batteries connected to an amp/volt meter remote display at all times, so I am always aware of the draw. I don't have that kind of parasitic load, unless perhaps I leave the inverter on when not in use. Samlex Inverter On sunny days I am usually charged by 10AM, on cloudy days it may take the day. If I am in a pinch, I can just start the V10, it has a 130A alternator. (175 in the new one) Sometimes I will do this in the AM when making coffee, it's actually a lot quieter than the 4Kw generator I have.

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 09/25/18 08:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have read these threads with interest for the last 15 years thinking someday my Norcold was going to fail and I would have to replace it with a residential or another propane electric. I dry camp 95% of the time and tried to compare costs going to residential. What I have gleaned from these discussions is that I would have to add 2 more batteries, at least another 100 amp battery charger maybe more if I wanted to reduce generator time, a pure sine wave inverter to run the residential, some solar and all the cabling to keep the 4 6 v GC batteries healthy not sure If I missed anything. My question is what would all this cost vs a new Norcold if one had to pay someone to do all this work?

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