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 > Leave the emergency(parking) brake off?

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rbrand

Victoria, BC, Canada

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Posted: 09/07/17 01:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a brake caliper seize heading up Vancouver Island. I had it replaced at OK tire in Duncan. Excellent service had me out in an hour.
The fellow that I was dealing with said that if an Motorhome is left sitting for a extended period of time. It should be left with the parking brake off. This will help prevent the brake caliper from seizing up.

I've never heard of this.

What are your opinions?


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SidecarFlip

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Posted: 09/07/17 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree. I never set my emergency brake when parked. Your parking pawl in your transmission case will hold your coach just fine.

I'm sure someone will contradict that, but that is what I do as well.


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Matt_Colie

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Posted: 09/07/17 02:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is actually true of everything these days...

Either use it all the time so it stays free, or leave it alone. There is no "sometimes" about it.

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Posted: 09/07/17 02:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

I agree.


Different situation.

He said "during long periods of storage"......and I presume on a flat place.

You should NOT count on the transmission pawl to hold the coach when parked. If you INSIST on not setting the parking brake, you should chock at least two sets of wheels.

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Posted: 09/07/17 02:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't buy it. Caliper can seize up either way from non-use.
Does the parking brake really actuate the disk or a drum brake?

If you don't use it much I recommend lubing the slide areas when you change brake fluid every two years.

My test is to put transmission in neutral. If it starts to roll set the parking brake. After you verify the parking brake is holding the vehicle then put transmission into park.


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Posted: 09/07/17 03:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Totally agree.
Very common problem with speciatly and classic cars that sit all winter.


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klutchdust

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Posted: 09/07/17 03:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

I don't buy it. Caliper can seize up either way from non-use.
Does the parking brake really actuate the disk or a drum brake?

If you don't use it much I recommend lubing the slide areas when you change brake fluid every two years.

My test is to put transmission in neutral. If it starts to roll set the parking brake. After you verify the parking brake is holding the vehicle then put transmission into park.



I have wrenched my entire life. I have changed brake fluid only when the repair called for it, be it a broken line or whatever. My question is this,what has changed in the brake fluid industry that some feel the need to replace their fluid. One of my vehicles i owned for over 25 years, it stopped just fine and had no indication of fluid losing it's ability to work properly.
Recently a friend told me the quick lube stores are recommending it to customers.

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Posted: 09/07/17 03:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

time2roll wrote:

I don't buy it. Caliper can seize up either way from non-use.
Does the parking brake really actuate the disk or a drum brake?

If you don't use it much I recommend lubing the slide areas when you change brake fluid every two years.

My test is to put transmission in neutral. If it starts to roll set the parking brake. After you verify the parking brake is holding the vehicle then put transmission into park.



I have wrenched my entire life. I have changed brake fluid only when the repair called for it, be it a broken line or whatever. My question is this,what has changed in the brake fluid industry that some feel the need to replace their fluid. One of my vehicles i owned for over 25 years, it stopped just fine and had no indication of fluid losing it's ability to work properly.
Recently a friend told me the quick lube stores are recommending it to customers.


It has also been a good idea to change it regularly because moisture builds up in it and makes it less effective and rots things like wheel cylinders and all the other iron components. That same moisture also kills anti-lock components. Changing fluid is cheap insurance against expensive repairs.
Personally, I can feel a difference in the intial bite of brakes and stronger pedal after really ancient fluid has been changed.

While it's best not to store a vehicle with the E brake on, it's crucial that it is used regularly when the rig is being driven in order to keep it working freely.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 09/07/17 03:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ScottG wrote:

klutchdust wrote:

time2roll wrote:

I don't buy it. Caliper can seize up either way from non-use.
Does the parking brake really actuate the disk or a drum brake?

If you don't use it much I recommend lubing the slide areas when you change brake fluid every two years.

My test is to put transmission in neutral. If it starts to roll set the parking brake. After you verify the parking brake is holding the vehicle then put transmission into park.



I have wrenched my entire life. I have changed brake fluid only when the repair called for it, be it a broken line or whatever. My question is this,what has changed in the brake fluid industry that some feel the need to replace their fluid. One of my vehicles i owned for over 25 years, it stopped just fine and had no indication of fluid losing it's ability to work properly.
Recently a friend told me the quick lube stores are recommending it to customers.


It has also been a good idea to change it regularly because moisture builds up in it and makes it less effective and rots things like wheel cylinders and all the other iron components. That same moisture also kills anti-lock components. Changing fluid is cheap insurance against expensive repairs.
Personally, I can feel a difference in the initial bite of brakes and stronger pedal after really ancient fluid has been changed.


Thats good information. i didn't take into account the new components in these systems.

ScottG

Bothell Wa.

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Posted: 09/07/17 03:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

ScottG wrote:

klutchdust wrote:

time2roll wrote:

I don't buy it. Caliper can seize up either way from non-use.
Does the parking brake really actuate the disk or a drum brake?

If you don't use it much I recommend lubing the slide areas when you change brake fluid every two years.

My test is to put transmission in neutral. If it starts to roll set the parking brake. After you verify the parking brake is holding the vehicle then put transmission into park.



I have wrenched my entire life. I have changed brake fluid only when the repair called for it, be it a broken line or whatever. My question is this,what has changed in the brake fluid industry that some feel the need to replace their fluid. One of my vehicles i owned for over 25 years, it stopped just fine and had no indication of fluid losing it's ability to work properly.
Recently a friend told me the quick lube stores are recommending it to customers.


It has also been a good idea to change it regularly because moisture builds up in it and makes it less effective and rots things like wheel cylinders and all the other iron components. That same moisture also kills anti-lock components. Changing fluid is cheap insurance against expensive repairs.
Personally, I can feel a difference in the initial bite of brakes and stronger pedal after really ancient fluid has been changed.


Thats good information. i didn't take into account the new components in these systems.


Some of them you even have to hook up a scan tool and actuate the anti-lock servo's in order to bleed them. [emoticon]

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