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 > Your search for posts made by 'klutchdust' found 104 matches.

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RE: Wheel Bearings

"When did you do all this service work on semi-trailers that used grease in the wheel bearings? My axles from the early '80s all had oil bath bearings. And most fleets large enough to have shops to do their own service work buy large amounts of the same lube." Sea going equipment in LA Harbor. Very common for shipping companies to spec new equipment and have grease bearing axles. With the uncertainty of when a piece of equipment would come to the shop, they felt the grease bearings were the better option. We ran about half grease half oil bath. Very seldom had a chassis come in with a grease bearing leaking on the drum, the oil bath seals would dry out from sitting and leak. Sometimes a chassis may sit for a few years and not be used .
klutchdust 08/14/22 09:48pm Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

By tracking, I mean traveling on a straight stretch of road, the truck and trailer travel in a straight line as one unit. I don't feel the trailer wiggling independently. Not much, but I can feel it. ST tires have stiffer sidewalls than LT tires. Doesn't make much difference going straight down the road. Significantly underinflated tires can make a big difference in how much the trailer moves around independent of the truck.I run my LRE tires on the trailer at 70 psi as that is compatable with the weight on each tire. When towing, I run the LRE tires on my Ram CTD at 60psi front and 70psi rear which is what the door sticker says. I run all the truck tires at 50psi when running empty. I have very even tread wear. I get 50,000 miles out of a set of Michelin ATs on the truck. Trailer wiggle comes from improper loading as well. In all my years of towing I can't say that my tires made a difference nor could I tell if it was the tires.There are so many variables how can one narrow it down to the tires. Glad you figured it out. After replacing my tires recently and going down the road nothing changed. I have loaded the rear heavy with wood, nothing changed. I have a Work and Play toy hauler 25ft. 100 gallon water tank mounted between the axles, empty or full, same. 2000 lb Polaris vs. Honda Ruckus ,same. It pays off to have your WD hitch properly adjusted and for the driver to fully understand what it is doing. FWIW, the salesman who set it up when you picked it up, nope.....
klutchdust 08/14/22 12:12pm Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearings

I would go on vacation and not give it a second thought. A repack every year is way overkill. I think I have repacked mine every 5 years possibly more. And when you did, how did they look? my guess is, they looked pretty good, but since I have the wheel off......
klutchdust 08/14/22 12:03pm Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

Date codes, yeah, what are they? LOL Do you know how to read them? Gee, there is so much tread left.... air compressor, carry one with you? Infrared thermometer? great for quick checking tires, ..all about the same temp, good. One hotter than the others, bad.
klutchdust 08/14/22 09:25am Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearings

"Used to be, likely still applies, not a good idea to mix different types/brands of grease. " I would really like to see some proof or research/testing done by a reliable source to back up that statement. Having serviced hundreds of semi trailer units and not knowing what grease was used previously, it was a rarity, rarity that a bearing in our fleet of over 10k units ever had a bearing failure. A bearing was only serviced when the unit was brought into the shop for a brake change. That could be anywhere from 1 year or 5 years. Servicing wheel bearings every year is just nonsense. I call malarky on that one.
klutchdust 08/14/22 08:57am Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

So IF I change my tires and IF I "feel" differently will that interfere with my "peace of mind". I have read where "peace of mind" can be achieved by giving a salesman loads of cash with the hope that if something goes wrong it is covered by the warranty he just sold them. After reading their issue is not covered then they may "feel" differently. If they "feel" differently will the placebo effect wear off and their trailer "track" differently?
klutchdust 08/13/22 04:13pm Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

I tend to agree with the OP. I think good tires do track better. Also, notice that he went from a load range C to a D. I think a load range C would be marginal at best on a trailer that weight. I can see where the D would make a difference.My TT has 9,000 on the axles. I run LRE on 16 inch wheels. I've run the original Chinabombs, LTs and now, Goodyear Endurance. While it's not great, I can feel a difference in the tracking of different tires. The Endurance are the best in my experience. Help me to understand what "difference in tracking" means. I installed new tires on my toyhauler, loaded the off road vehicle and off I went. I felt no difference in "tracking". Installing new tires on a motor vehicle the difference is felt right away when you steer. How do new tires on a trailer influence tracking. And what exactly is tracking. There are no adjustable components on TT. Semi trailers I have adjusted alignment on. 1/2 inch towards the crown of the road.
klutchdust 08/13/22 12:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

I tend to agree with the OP. I think good tires do track better. Also, notice that he went from a load range C to a D. I think a load range C would be marginal at best on a trailer that weight. I can see where the D would make a difference.My TT has 9,000 on the axles. I run LRE on 16 inch wheels. I've run the original Chinabombs, LTs and now, Goodyear Endurance. While it's not great, I can feel a difference in the tracking of different tires. The Endurance are the best in my experience. Help me to understand what "difference in tracking" means. I installed new tires on my toyhauler, loaded the off road vehicle and off I went. I felt no difference in "tracking". Installing new tires on a vehicle the difference is felt right away when you steer. How do new tires on a trailer influence tracking. And what exactly is tracking. There are no adjustable components on TT. Semi trailers I have adjusted alignment on. 1/2 inch towards the crown of the road.
klutchdust 08/13/22 12:23pm Travel Trailers
RE: The best upgrade for your TT

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent. Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it. Not again.. http://www.sherv.net/cm/emoticons/hand-gestures/facepalm-hand-gesture-smiley-emoticon.gif If it makes YOU "feel better" then run with it. Myself, Have used what every tires I can find which are readily available and never had drivability, stability or blow outs issues.. Perhaps you neglected to periodically add air and have been running the tires under inflated and the new tires the shop filled them for you? Tires naturally lose 1-2 PSI per month.. Highly doubt your tire selection on the trailer made a difference, you can drive for miles with a flat ripped up tire and not even know it is dead.. Same here. My tires were dry rotted and put some Carlisles on . I have not heard from anyone that tows that they can "feel" their trailer bouncing more or that their tires are "squishy". The first item on the pre-trip list is always tire pressure. How many do it? Look at the carcasses on the side of the road. An under inflated tire is your worst enemy. You could "feel" really good and add nitrogen @15 dollars a tire. :R
klutchdust 08/13/22 10:14am Travel Trailers
RE: Newbie Tow Capacity Question

The real fun will be when you have to figure out how to adjust the weight distribution hitch.
klutchdust 08/12/22 03:31pm Travel Trailers
RE: Decal removal replacement

I solved the problem. Contacted a sign painter who free style painted . following lines left by removal, repainted all in the colors of old decals $200.00. Best investment to spruce up my older class C Great idea. Photos?
klutchdust 08/12/22 03:30pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Bottom wiper seal on slide out for Shadow Cruiser 280QBS

When the slide is in the in position, can you access the seal from inside the coach.
klutchdust 08/12/22 02:01pm Travel Trailers
RE: Honda Ridgeline hauling a Forrest River 201 BHXL

The tow rating is the highest possible weight that the pickup can tow. It may seem like a simple number, but there are many factors that contribute to determining how much trailer your truck can safely tow. It’s also important to understand that the truck’s tow rating assumes the truck has all mandatory towing options to reach that number, and doesn’t have any cargo in the bed of the truck. And, yes, there’s some math involved to make sure your pickup truck isn’t over its gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) and that the truck and loaded trailer don’t exceed the gross combined weight rating (GCWR)—see below for definitions. Here’s an example from Chevrolet that shows the math: Trailer weight: 10,000 pounds Pickup truck GVWR: 7,000 pounds Pickup truck weight before added payload: 5,500 pounds Payload added to pickup: Two occupants: 300 pounds Extra cargo: 100 pounds Trailer hitch equipment: 75 pounds Trailer tongue weight: 1,000 pounds (10 percent of trailer weight) Total payload: 1,475 pounds Tow vehicle weight (5,500 pounds) + Payload (1,475 pounds) = 6,975 pounds, which is just shy of the truck’s 7,000-pound GVWR. As this example shows, a pickup truck’s payload adds up quickly when towing, in large part because of the trailer’s tongue weight. This means that if you’re towing near your truck’s limits, you might have to leave some cargo or passengers at home to stay within its safe capacities.
klutchdust 08/11/22 06:04pm Travel Trailers
RE: 2008 r vision wall sinking

The wall needs to be held up by the frame. "If it were my trailer" I would remove the support with the bolt in it, install angle iron to go underneath and up the side of the wall an few inches, then weld new supports from the main frame to hold the angle up. Some holes through the angle and into the wall and fasten the two together. Remember to eliminate electrolysis always use a clear barrier tape in-between aluminum and steel. Now, I weld and fabricate however find a shop nearby and see what they can do. I was in the heavy equipment industry as a career. We would repair semi trailers this way that had cracks in their main side rails, trailers that held 40k pounds and up. Now being limited by the photos that is my best idea. More photos from further away would be helpful.
klutchdust 08/11/22 11:26am Travel Trailers
RE: Newbie Tow Capacity Question

You should read up and complete, fact based, unbiased information; without all the sideshow chatter. Clicky Exactly. Some on here would approve of this: https://i.imgur.com/jGiM3Nvl.jpg
klutchdust 08/08/22 02:33pm Travel Trailers
RE: Jacking For Tire Change

Trailer axles are not solid, they are pipe. Notice the wiring that travels through some applications. Schedule 80 is common. I was referring to the accepted terminology of "solid axle" where both wheels are rigidly connected to each other. Just for clarity, as I thought that was a commonly used term. Has nothing to do with whether the axle is tubular or not.:S In the field of heavy mechanics and machinery the term solid axle and straight axle mean different things. To the layman saying "solid axle" it shows me they know not what they speak of. Trailer axles are straight axles. Then you get into the torsion axles. :S When you read comments on forums you can figure out quickly who has actually wrenched on a vehicle and who changed a tire a few times. If lifting a trailer to change a tire will somehow magically twist or torque the frame then explain how using the leveling jacks at a campsite or driving onto those plastic wedges or boards and having it sit there a week doesn't damage anything. LOL. We have chained axles up and driven safely many miles without damage to anything. knowing what you are doing makes the difference.
klutchdust 08/04/22 12:30pm Travel Trailers
RE: Jacking For Tire Change

Literally one the most universally competent places to jack up about any solid axle is under the spring perches or u bolts. There is nothing special about any of the probably 100 different trailers that I’ve tossed a jack under for one reason or another, that I’ve seen. In general, if you support it there or under the frame (within reason) and something gets damaged, it wasn’t going to last anyway. As always common sense applies. If you have a 3000lb buggy sitting over the axles of a toyhauler and you jack up the back corner of the frame, or something like that, you may tweak something. Trailer axles are not solid, they are pipe. Notice the wiring that travels through some applications. Schedule 80 is common.
klutchdust 08/04/22 09:01am Travel Trailers
RE: Jacking For Tire Change

I have jacked anything from a single axle utility trailer to a loaded semi by placing the jack under the plate that is secured by the u-bolts. As you proceed it compresses the leaf springs and eventually raises the tire. The axle stays straight. That is the safest way to lift a trailer. Started doing that in 1972. Lifted hundreds of Semi's that way. Travel trailers the same. Stay away from the axle UNLESS it is on a semi trailer. A travel trailer axle is just a pipe, and a weak one at that.
klutchdust 08/03/22 04:58pm Travel Trailers
RE: Assessing RV Value

"Talking about stickers and MSRPs when it comes to the RV Industry is mental masturbation. " Only to the misinformed. :B
klutchdust 08/01/22 09:04am Travel Trailers
RE: Assessing RV Value

Never trade in an RV. Unlike the auto industry there is no reliable "book" price. For new or used. The only way to know what you are really paying for an RV is to pay cash. And the only way to know what you are recieving for your old RV is to sell it for cash. I will not knock the RV dealers much for this, as they deal with the same uncertainties in a trade in situation as well. If they misjudge what they can sell for your trade, then they stand to lose money on the deal. Obviously if that happens too often, they can't stay in buisiness. When you trade in and then buy a new vehicle, the dealer is making a bunch of dough. If he has a trailer for 30k you most likely could bargain that down 3 grand. If you trade and he says Ill give you 6000 grand for your trade he is deducting that 6 G from the 30, not the 27k number, so you are getting 3K for your trade. Trades are deducted from the sticker price, not a negotiated price.
klutchdust 07/31/22 08:08pm Travel Trailers
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