Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Search
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'StirCrazy' found 585 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 30  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: 25% better mpg from current diesels? Too good to be true?

Someone's going to say it, so it might as well be me: Getting rid of the poorly-executed emissions equipment on these engines would accomplish the same thing without an expensive fancy piston. actualy I don't think anyone was going to say it because it doesnt make any sence. emissions may be a garbage set up but they do lower emiaaions, if you take them off emissions will go up so taking them off will not do anything aside from a little bit better milage as the expence of more emissions. there has been a Canadian company testing these pistons in the engines they remanufacture for almost two years and here are there results "During testing, DFC Diesel observed fuel consumption reductions of 25% or more with factory tuning, an average of 5% increases in torque and horsepower, NOx reductions as high as 80%, and the ability to extend oil change intervals by 50% due to decreased soot and fuel dilution. Observed benefits also include reduced regeneration cycles, DEF consumption, and visible exhaust/opacity, along with noticeably smoother and quieter operation." SteveThere is more than the cost to measure value. Being able to increase range by 25% is worth something. I thought that was infered by the increase in fuel milage.....
StirCrazy 02/08/23 08:41am Tow Vehicles
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

Honestly you have to take ANY "reviews" on Amazon with a LARGE PORTION of SALT - %99 of them have no idea what they actually have or how to test/review it! However, let us talk about Batteries specifically shall we? How many consumers have AH meters? Programmable power supply? Load testers? Current meters? Even a DVM? (are any of the above even calibrated?) Lets face it, the average Joe/Jane consumer has nether the expertise or the equipment to properly test/review a battery. While it MAY be different for LFP batteries, the seemingly endless flood of useless/overrated consumer Lithium replacement batteries from China is what I'm basing my opinion on. Well then again there is the popular CATL 280AH LFP battery cells which I see listed having anywhere from 240-340AH on Amazon (for the SAME cells). (keep in mind much like FLA's, (while the number is growing) there are a limited number of Lithium and LFP OEM's in the world. - Mark0. Ya you have to read review some have no clue or just say "delivered fast" but I think the big thing to understand is how LiFePO4 chemistry works. New they are typicly rated from 3000-3500 cycles @ 100% discharge, by limiting your usage range say you keep it between say 20% and 80% with the off run to 100% to top balance and keep the usage and charging under 0.5C you could bump that cycle number up to 7000 or higher. but here is the magic about this chemistry. if you did 800 cycles on a typical GC2 battery it would be done (on average) so wouldnt hold a charge bal bal bal... on a LiFePO4 when you reach the cycle life you still have 80% of the capacity left and the degradation slows down.. so you could have another 3000 to 20000 cycles untill that battery wears out if you treat it nice.. Personaly I think the battery would age out before it would die from cycles. so alot of these 200 buck 100AH batteries you can buy were built using B grade cells, is that bad, I don't think so as long as you know that.. in my opinion they would still out last a FLA battery and give you more usable capacity for the same price.. the bad thing is they were advertising them as "A" grade and a typical "A" cell will pull more than its rated capacity. now a cell can be clasified as "B" grade for several reasons, a blemish, a barcode that doesnt work, doesnt pull over capacity.. (typicaly a "A" grade 304 eve cell will pull 310AH or higher new) but what lest scrupouls builders were doing was taking used cells which could be classed as "B" but shouldn't and building these batteries out of them. so they may have only had 200 to 2000 cycles on them but you didnt know so you might hit that 80% capacity faster than expected. EVE has cracked down on this by changing how there Bar codes are put on the casing so its not a sticker anymore or ink and on "B" grade batteries there is no bar code at all so places cant sell a "B" battery as a "A" As for Catl cells, they would be a third choice for me but they use the same outter casing for simular capacities, what you have to look at is the weight so the Catl 240 is 5.1Kg (+/- 10g) 207 x 173.9 x 71.3mm the 280Ah is 5.34Kg (+/- 10g) 207 x 174 x 72 mm 302Ah is 5.51Kg (+/- 10g) 207.2 x 174 x 71.65 mm With Eve which is the only cell I'll buy for DIY builds there is a 4mm hight difference between there 280AH and 304AH and almost a 0.3kg weight difference also
StirCrazy 02/08/23 08:35am Truck Campers
RE: 25% better mpg from current diesels? Too good to be true?

Someone's going to say it, so it might as well be me: Getting rid of the poorly-executed emissions equipment on these engines would accomplish the same thing without an expensive fancy piston. actualy I don't think anyone was going to say it because it doesnt make any sence. emissions may be a garbage set up but they do lower emiaaions, if you take them off emissions will go up so taking them off will not do anything aside from a little bit better milage as the expence of more emissions. there has been a Canadian company testing these pistons in the engines they remanufacture for almost two years and here are there results "During testing, DFC Diesel observed fuel consumption reductions of 25% or more with factory tuning, an average of 5% increases in torque and horsepower, NOx reductions as high as 80%, and the ability to extend oil change intervals by 50% due to decreased soot and fuel dilution. Observed benefits also include reduced regeneration cycles, DEF consumption, and visible exhaust/opacity, along with noticeably smoother and quieter operation." Steve
StirCrazy 02/07/23 08:10am Tow Vehicles
RE: Feedback on 12V water heater element as solar diversion load

What I don't understand is why you feel the need "to do something with excess solar harvest that would otherwise be wasted." It's not as if you would have to go out and buy new "solar harvest" if you waste it. It seems to me that this is a solution in search of a problem. Because wasting is...well...wasteful? Sure, this isn't a lot of wasted amps we're talking about and not worth buying a lot more stuff just to be "wasting" less. But a $25 heating element plus wiring and my time is play money if it works as described in the manual and/or as the thread I linked to. Rephrasing this, it an idea to offset a little bit of propane used for water heating when boondocking. People seem to get on this "we are waisting solar power when our batterys are full" kick every now and then. you are not waisting it, it is always being radiated and you can only waist somthing you have control over like a kitchen faucet left running for no reason. other wise we could say anyone who doesn't have a solar panel is waisting energy. now personaly I think the idea of a deversion load is kinda neat and a 12V water heater eliment would be awsome to save a bit on propane, I have two issues though. you are using a PWM controler so you are waisting solar energy by not having an efficient controler :B second I am not sure of it will put out enough energy to make the element hot enough to keep it above the temp where it starts the burner up again, it might though...
StirCrazy 02/07/23 07:56am Tech Issues
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

. . . I would argue there is more potential for something to go wring in a battle born with over 100 cells soldered in as aposed to a prismatic type with only 8 battery conections, but it will be easier to detect on the prismatic . . .I would argue there is less potential. The 100ah Battleborn (BB) battery cost more for a very good reason---better redundancy. BB uses 100+ cylindrical cells spot-welded in a parallel/series configuration (vs. series connected prismatic cells). Configured this way, a few cells can loose capacity or become unbalanced and have very little effect on the battery's overall output. 99% of the 100ah lifepo4 batteries on Amazon, etc., use prismatic cells. Typically 4 in series. If *any* of these 4 cells loose capacity or become unbalanced it directly and immediately degrades the overall output of the battery---potentially to the point the battery becomes almost unusable, all because of one cell. BB could have easily chosen to use less expensive prismatic cells, but they didn't in order to provide a more stable, robust battery.your talking about the noticable effect not the potential, and I did say that I believe. in a battle born if a solder joint comes lose it or a cell goes bad depending where it is you might not realy notice it or you may notice it a fair bit depending on the failur. in a prismatic if one goes bad you know it, which I concider a good thing and ease of changing out a cell in a prismatic system is by far more easy. I would argue also that prismatic may or may not be less expensive. the actual physical cell the celindrical cell is much cheper to produce on automated lines so to buy the cells them self the 120 cells in a 100AH battle born are cheeper than four 100AH prismatic cells untill recently.... the manufactuing process for prismatic has been altered and ramped up which is bring the cost down on prismatic quite significantly. you have less conections inside a prismatic battery so less chance for a factory defect, which also translates for lower labour costs. because you have 12 to 20 conections over 10 posts in a prismatic compared to the 240+ in a celinderical set up so the labour to wire/conect the cells is much less. the new production savings and increase in amounts of prismatic cells is making them more populer in automotive aplication which is bringing the price of automotive battery down. tesla is now doing all there chinese cars with LFP prismatic cells. SteveWe've been down this road before where I begin to have a difficult time following you. You're making general statements about various costs, faulty/excessive connections, manufacturing processes, the ease of changing cells, faulty solder connections, popularity, etc. You've made it clear that you feel batteries that use prismatic cells are "better", I get that. However, my previous post compared the *PARALLEL* and series cell arrangement used in the 100ah BB batteries to the *SERIES* ONLY cell arrangement used in 100ah batteries that use prismatic cells. Unless, you're willing to discuss this in some fashion, then I'm sorry, I have nothing further to add. not better, Ill try streamline my paragraph. prismatic cells are not "cheeper" or "lower quality" the reason for the higher cost involved in say battle born is the increased labour costs to assemble the batteries and the fact they havent realy keept up to the dropping LFP prices as they nave a nich market and do a good sales job of making people think they are vastly superior to other batteries. Battle born is a parallel/series battery where my battery is a series arangment, and in my 5th wheel I am building a series/parrallel setup , and yes if one cell goes bad in a prismatic you will notice it more, but at the same time it would take me about 5 min to replace the cell with a new one, I would be a few hours to try fix a battle born and need a lot more specialized tools in the battle born they use 120 1AH cells to make there 100AH battery so they basicly have 30 parralel lines, so if you lose one series line, you lose 1/30th of the battery capacity so yes in that way you have more built in redundency but I was talking about the chance of there being a problem with the battery not the effect. if you notice you lost a cell are you going to sent it in for repair? well that depends I don't think the adverage person would even notice it and run a defective battery for ever. hopefully they have the BMS set up to let you know if there is an issue as that is capable of knowing right away. does this make battle born better, maybe if your talking redundency, but I still don't think that redundency is worth the price there asking, the battle born by this time should be about 700 bucks concidering you can get thoes 120 cells for under 200 bucks. I have been looking at them laitly and trying to decide weather to build a prismatic for the 5th wheel or try build out of cilendrical cells. its a lot cheeper for me to buy the clindrical cells, and I cam print specilized holders with my 3D printer, but I would have to buy something to spot weld them togeather and figure that out.
StirCrazy 02/06/23 08:08am Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

. . . I would argue there is more potential for something to go wring in a battle born with over 100 cells soldered in as aposed to a prismatic type with only 8 battery conections, but it will be easier to detect on the prismatic . . .I would argue there is less potential. The 100ah Battleborn (BB) battery cost more for a very good reason---better redundancy. BB uses 100+ cylindrical cells spot-welded in a parallel/series configuration (vs. series connected prismatic cells). Configured this way, a few cells can loose capacity or become unbalanced and have very little effect on the battery's overall output. 99% of the 100ah lifepo4 batteries on Amazon, etc., use prismatic cells. Typically 4 in series. If *any* of these 4 cells loose capacity or become unbalanced it directly and immediately degrades the overall output of the battery---potentially to the point the battery becomes almost unusable, all because of one cell. BB could have easily chosen to use less expensive prismatic cells, but they didn't in order to provide a more stable, robust battery. your talking about the noticable effect not the potential, and I did say that I believe. in a battle born if a solder joint comes lose it or a cell goes bad depending where it is you might not realy notice it or you may notice it a fair bit depending on the failur. in a prismatic if one goes bad you know it, which I concider a good thing and ease of changing out a cell in a prismatic system is by far more easy. I would argue also that prismatic may or may not be less expensive. the actual physical cell the celindrical cell is much cheper to produce on automated lines so to buy the cells them self the 120 cells in a 100AH battle born are cheeper than four 100AH prismatic cells untill recently.... the manufactuing process for prismatic has been altered and ramped up which is bring the cost down on prismatic quite significantly. you have less conections inside a prismatic battery so less chance for a factory defect, which also translates for lower labour costs. because you have 12 to 20 conections over 10 posts in a prismatic compared to the 240+ in a celinderical set up so the labour to wire/conect the cells is much less. the new production savings and increase in amounts of prismatic cells is making them more populer in automotive aplication which is bringing the price of automotive battery down. tesla is now doing all there chinese cars with LFP prismatic cells. Steve
StirCrazy 02/05/23 10:02am Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

.. positive stuff about Battle Born…… agreed or not?I always buy the best I can afford, and if you plan on RVing for many more years, I would buy the BBs. It's not that cheaper products won't work, it's for how *long* they will work. My life experience is 'you get what you pay for.'.. every time. battleborn is way over priced for what it is. the componants are being used by other as 1/2 the price and with a different formfactor (ie prismatic instead of round battery cells, even less while the technology and quality remains the same. I would argue there is more potential for something to go wring in a battle born with over 100 cells soldered in as aposed to a prismatic type with only 8 battery conections, but it will be easier to detect on the prismatic. when battle born came out they were almost the only player so they could set there pricing where they wanted.. now they have failed to drop there pricing to reflect current componant pricing so other have filled that space with quality products. what did battle born do, they launched dragonfly there OEM division for rv shops and such so they can charge 3800 cdn plus taxes for a 270AH battery. no thanks concidering I built my first 280AH battery for under 700 bucks. saving 3000 is worth learning how to do it to me haha here is a good video from will about the 3 cheepest good quality batteries and he even mentions ones not to buy. video
StirCrazy 02/04/23 09:24am Truck Campers
RE: How to keep a TC from being stolen when not on the truck?

I will lower it down so it is more stable, that and a truck can't get under it. I have powered jacks. If someone wants it bad enough they can still break in and power up the jacks from inside if they find the remote and know what they are doing. If you are worried about that happening I would put a tracking device in the camper or an airtag at a minimum. or just declutch them and use a drill with a end like the manual crank has, disconecting the batteries or hiding the remote won't stop the ability you run the jacks by hand.
StirCrazy 02/04/23 08:26am Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

If you get the 40 amp there is a pin that can be pulled to limit it to 20 amps. oh thats good to know makes that a no brainer then. can leave it on 20 and use 40 only when I realy need it.. thanks
StirCrazy 02/03/23 07:23am Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

Huge kudos to our dc to dc charger for keeping our lifepo4 charged while we're on the road. Without it, we'd only get a fraction of the use out of the inverter (and a/c unit) that we do. which DC to DC did you go with, I am looking at a renogy but trying to decide between the 20 amp or the 40 amp. Steve
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:06pm Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

Me, I'd give the Renogy RNG-INVT-2000-12V-P2 a try. Amazon sells it for $306 with a 30-day return. Even if it only has a 4000 watt *peak* surge/power rating (vs. 4000 watt for 5 sec), it still may work. For me, it would be worth the risk of a simple return to potentially save $400-$800. That's a good suggestion - and low risk. But I just looked at this Xantrex: https://www.donrowe.com/Xantrex-806-1220-PROwatt-SW-2000-p/806-1220.htm More expensive, for sure but the specs say: 1800 watts continuous power output 2000 watts for 5 minutes 3000 watts surge (peak power) Pure sine wave output (< 5% THD ) 5 minutes @ 2000 watts? Am I reading that right - that's differerent from peak power, I assume? I'm thinking that would easily run my MW zantrex used to be good.. for what its worth the renogy can handle 2000 watts continious but they are smart and still only recomend 1800 watts continious so you not flirting with that line, but that is aceptable if your only running the microwave. if you start running an microwave and coffee pot at the same time then you will have issues. the renogy is also <3% THD Steve
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:04pm Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

no, it is thier one that is on sale for 369 cdn right now and includes battery cables and a remot control 2000W 12V Pure Sine Wave Inverter SKU: RNG-INVT-2000-12V-P2-CA SteveThanks for clarifying, Steve. I have no reason to doubt you were quoted 4000 watts for 5 sec. I've had all kinds of specs and claims quoted to me over the years. Interesting that Renogy fails to advertise this outstanding capability anywhere in writing. All their online literature and specs simply claim a generic 4000 watt *peak* surge/power rating. For the sake of discussion, I will say this: *IF* this $300 (US) 2000 watt Renogy RNG-INVT-2000-12V-P2-US inverter is capable of 4000w for 5 sec, it would make it one of the best performing high-frequency 2000w inverters on the market, regardless of price. Unfortunately, this is a huge if. As they say, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Really? I'm trying to verify this. How did you get the info? I am just about to pull the trigger on an inverter and want to make sure it will power my 900 w microwave that shows a draw of 1350 watts, as stated earlier. I have been wavering between Renogy, GoPower and Victron. Victron is a lot more expensive, but I want to do this right. GoPower is about $700 US and Renogy a lot cheaper. I don't want to cheap out, but don't want to spend the extra if the Renogy 2000 w in the $300 range will really work well. How do I confirm this? Thanks! it will run your microwave no problem. I put in a inqury ticket on there web paged and had to go back and forth with a couple emails to get the information I was looking for. so for the overload they said a few tenths of a milisecond but the max power should hold up to 5 seconds. there are plenty of reviews of people using it for tools and such which would be a harder starting current in my opinion, also several who use it for there microwaves. if you think about it your household 15amp breaker which most people run a mixrowave off of has a limit of 1800 watts but a much larger capacity to run over.. a 900 watt microwave could pull up to about 2700 watts at start up but that kind of in rush or what ever you want to call it only lasts a few milli seconds. on a electric motor it can last significantly longer. I personaly wouldnt have an issue running my rv microwave off this one or even a larger countertop. but if your on the fence about it you could buy the renogy 3000 watt inverter on sale right now for 469.00 both the 2000 and the 3000 have plugs on board and the ability to wire it to the fuse panel so it can power any outlet in your rv. they also have the remote control pendent so you can set the main unit in auto and turn it off and on as you need it from inside the rv. I have my 2000 watt go power mounted in the front storage comparment by the batteries and then wired directly to my breaker panel so when I want to use the coffee pot or the microwave I use the remote panel to turn it on then switch it off when I am done so I am not drawing standby current. Steve
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:00pm Truck Campers
RE: MPH vs MPG

No beatings here. Again, I watch fuel economy about as much as I watch what I eat…(in the Mc Ds drive thru atm). But I have hand calculated a few times on a few vehicles. Usually when bored on a road trip and never been way out of whack like some claim. Although I know how to properly adjust for tire size etc. haha I just worry about it because I hate stopping for diesel when your towing a 40 foot 5th :B better milage I can get the easier it is to get it set up then run to town fill the truck, grab the groceries the wife forgot to pack and so on haha.
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:43am Towing
RE: BAL Accu-Slide maxed out on adjustment

as long as all your pullys and such are good, I would remove some chain links. but I would check all the piviot points and anchor points first to make sure there isn't anything wrong there. it could be that who ever put it togeather just mounted stuff in slightly wrong places causeing excess cable or the cable streched a bit from use.
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:40am Tech Issues
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

ok so here are the specs. once again renogy customer service was quick and efficient. so there is two specs one for max power (4000watts) and one for overload protection. so it will handle the max power (4000watts) for 5 seconds and if it hits a overload conditions that will trip the inverter to protect it with in 40milli seconds.You didn't state the model number. I would assume that's for the Renogy low-frequency 2000 watt inverter which costs about $600 and weighs about 50 lbs., right? That toroidal coil, which helps provide all the inrush current, makes for a heavy unit. Specs for most of these 2000 watt low-frequency inverters are somewhat similar in terms of their power/duration specs. The high-frequency Renogy 2000 watt inverter, which costs about $300 and weighs 12 lbs. only has a 4000 watt peak rating as far as I can tell. My guess, the peak rating means it will only output 4000 watts for 20-40 milliseconds. Not enough time to produce much inrush current. I believe this is the unit the OP was looking at purchasing. The Xantrex 2000 watt Freedom X inverter, which I believe is also a high-frequency unit (at 15 lbs.), will output 4000 watts >2 sec. Xantrex states specifically it's very effective for starting motors. That's an awesome spec for a high-frequency inverter. no, it is thier one that is on sale for 369 cdn right now and includes battery cables and a remot control 2000W 12V Pure Sine Wave Inverter SKU: RNG-INVT-2000-12V-P2-CA Steve
StirCrazy 02/02/23 07:23am Truck Campers
RE: MPH vs MPG

Thanks for sharing. And not surprising. 50% fuel consumption increase giver take when towing a big sail has been the recipe forever. Nothing new. Old Dmax and Cummins were in the 18/9 category around 70-75 mph (flat no wind). Newer Cummins is in the 14/7 range thanks to the lift, tires and too tall gears. Would be the same 18/9 if it was stock. It does lend some credibility to those who claim 25mpg out of their big diesels. But what they forget to mention is they’re drivin miss daisy and p!ssing off the line of cars behind them who may actually have some where to be before their next birthday. naa not driving miss daisy after I tuned my ford (emmisions on) I get 10.1 l/100km or 23.3 MPG US or 28 MPG CDN doing at 68 mph that 10kph over the speed limit here in BC and the speed limit in Alberta on that road. of course thats empty and using cruze control, I am looking forward to trying it out towing the 5th wheel and hauling the camper to see the difference there.
StirCrazy 02/01/23 08:03am Towing
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

On refrigeration equipment you might find "locked rotor amperage" (LRA) which would be worse than normal inrush current.Sorry, have to respectfully disagree. One cannot be any "worse" or better than the other since they both, more or less, describe the same thing. Air conditioner manufacturers use LRA to quantify the inrush current drawn by the compressor motor at its rated voltage when the rotor is kept stationary. Or, put another way, LRA quantifies the inrush current necessary to place a stationary or locked rotor in a compressor motor in motion. No manufacturer specs their in rush current.Agree, it's not very common for manufacturers to use the term inrush current when providing specs for their products. The primary reason is because inrush current is a general descriptor for a short, momentary burst (or inrush) of current. The time/duration for measuring inrush current can vary for RV a/c compressors and small household motors as opposed to large commercial equipment. Inrush current, in terms of starting RV a/c compressors and smaller consumer-type AC motors, is typically measured in less than a second. A Fluke or Amprobe inrush current capable clamp-on ammeter bears this out because it provides inrush current results in less than second. The time/duration for the inrush current analysis is less than a second, but obviously much longer than what's required for a peak reading. With that being said . . . if an inverter or inverter generator manufacturer specifies current and time/duration at multiple power levels, one can use this data to approximate inrush current performance. For example, a 2000 watt inverter (with a 2000 watt "continuous" power rating) that also has a 4000 watt *peak* power rating will probably provide minimal inrush current. A 2000 watt inverter that can also output 4000 watts for 1-2 seconds should provide excellent inrush current. A 2000 watt inverter that is capable of producing 4000 watts for 5-10 seconds (and/or 6000 watts for 1-2 seconds) should provide outstanding inrush current. Hope this helps. ok so here are the specs. once again renogy customer service was quick and efficient. so there is two specs one for max power (4000watts) and one for overload protection. so it will handle the max power (4000watts) for 5 seconds and if it hits a overload conditions that will trip the inverter to protect it with in 40milli seconds.
StirCrazy 02/01/23 07:45am Truck Campers
RE: Used 6-point levelers to change a flat

I tried a few times years ago to jack up one side of the fiver with the Lippert 6-point leveler jacks, but they just wouldn't raise one side off the ground on a level-ish surface. The last time I had a flat I used my old Boy Scout trick of loosening the lugs and then moving the trailer forward to get the bad wheel over a hole in the ground to change it. Last Friday I had a blowout and we were on pavement with no dirt nearby (no way to find a hole or dig my own). I had an inspiration though, and I'm kicking myself for not trying this sooner. I just put a stack of yellow leveling blocks over each of the jacks and raised the entire trailer off the ground after I loosened the lugs. The whole thing was done in under a half hour and my wife was dazzled: "Wow - New Personal Best". It made it a million times easier to get to the spare too. https://i.imgur.com/Nr8LxgXl.jpg when I do it I just put the stacks under the side i want to lift then put the off side down so they just touch the ground and manualy lift the flat side. might work different with a 4 point over a 6 point though I am not sure.
StirCrazy 01/31/23 08:02am General RVing Issues
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

IMO the most important takeaway when discussing inrush, starting, peak, or surge, current is the following: unless a specific time or duration (or testing standard/protocol) is specified for any given current rating, the current rating provides little insight into how the device will perform in the realworld.I do agree the lack of companies putting this in there advertising makes things a little more difficult. personaly I have never been met with any issues when I email the company and ask for that information.You mentioned the Renogy 2000w PSW inverter. Very popular unit. Always wondered what time/duration they used for their peak rating. Did you happen to get this info? not yet. I was actualy going to email them and see after what you said the other day. hang on I'll email them now and let you know. I have a go power 2000watt inverter in the 5th wheel and it has never had an issue running anything. I think it actualy started my ac once by accident haha.. but I am looking at the renogy for the camper. Steve
StirCrazy 01/31/23 08:00am Truck Campers
RE: Inverter and battery sizing to power my camper microwave

IMO the most important takeaway when discussing inrush, starting, peak, or surge, current is the following: unless a specific time or duration (or testing standard/protocol) is specified for any given current rating, the current rating provides little insight into how the device will perform in the realworld.I do agree the lack of companies putting this in there advertising makes things a little more difficult. personaly I have never been met with any issues when I email the company and ask for that information.You mentioned the Renogy 2000w PSW inverter. Very popular unit. Always wondered what time/duration they used for their peak rating. Did you happen to get this info? not yet. I was actualy going to email them and see after what you said the other day. hang on I'll email them now and let you know. Steve
StirCrazy 01/31/23 07:58am Truck Campers
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 30  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2023 CWI, Inc. © 2023 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.